'PEEL FOREST Cafe & General Store'

Camp ground facilities
Camp ground facilities
'Peel Forest General Store' manage a motor camp at Clarke Flat near the Rangitata River which has modern ablution and amenity blocks, cabins with disabled access, caravan power points and attractive campsites.  This is the only area where camping is allowed in the (South Canterbury Scenic) Reserve.
Click here to view a map of the 'Peel Forest Camp'

Please see pricing below (daily rates):

Campsites
$17.00 per adult per night
$7.50 per child under 18
Under 5's are free
$5.00 per night for power

(visit: www.doc.govt.nz for more information)

Cabins
$50.00 per night - up to 2 persons
Additional adult - $15.00 per night
Additional child over 3 yrs - $10.00 per night

Note: Bottom sheet, pillow & pillowcases are provided in the cabins, however please supply your own bedding ie sleeping bag or duvet .
Campers must bring their own pots and pans, knives, forks etc

Dogs of any breed are not allowed.

 


 

Rangitata Valley Views
Join us on the ''Mail Run' and take in the breathtaking views of the Rangitata Valley over two hours.  We depart from the store at 1pm and return at 3pm. We also can drop off and pick up for those who would like to start or finish at the Hakatere Conservation Park .

Cost is $10 per person,  please contact us for transport times .
 

Clearwater's Farm
Clearwater's Farm
Committed to the organic principals of farming, 'Clearwater's' dairy farm in Peel Forest produce certified organic milk & cream top yoghurt ('set in the pot').  They aim to provide the local community with delicious products at reasonable prices.
At 'Clearwater's Farm' the benefits of the soil-foodweb science are becoming increasingly noticeable, through animal health and farm yields.

       
+ Click on an image above to enlarge.
Please click here for more information about 'Clearwater's Farm' (PDF format)


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Opihi Vineyard & Cafe
Opihi Vineyard & Cafe
Whilst in the area, we highly recommend a visit to the 'Opihi Vineyard & Cafe'.
A truly boutique wine business, the vineyard is located 30km inland from Timaru in South Canterbury New Zealand. The Opihi label has gained awards at many major wine shows, and has also been recommended by Wine State and Cusine magazines.
Nestled in the South Canterbury countryside, with views to the mountains, is Historic Clifton Cottage, home to the Opihi Vineyard Cafe. Visitors to the café enjoy a range of delicious and interesting dishes to tempt the most discerning palate.
Please click here for more information.

ATTRACTIONS & FACILITIES
(for more information click on the links below, or use the scroll bar on the right)

Rangitata Mail Run
Camp ground facilities
Clearwater's Farm
Mt Peel Range
Te Kahui Kaupeka Conservation Park
Horse riding
Rafting & Canoeing
Fishing
Cultural heritage sites


LINKS
www.rafts.co.nz
www.peelforesthorsetrekking.co.nz
www.alps2ocean.co.nz
www.hiddenvalleys.co.nz
www.peelforestopc.org.nz

 

Walking / tramping (Peel Forest Park track info


Mt Peel Range
Mt Peel Range
The Mt Peel Range includes the three peaks of Mt Peel as well as Coal Hill. The high peak of Mt Peel (Tarahaoa or Big Mt Peel) is outside the park and provides an enjoyable day’s tramp for fit and experienced trampers. It can be reached by the ridge from Little Mt Peel over Middle Mt Peel, or by Northwest Ridge from Parson’s Creek Hut. (Permission should be obtained from the Mt Peel Station.)


Te Kahui Kaupeka Conservation Park
Te Kahui Kaupeka Conservation Park
Te Kahui Kaupeka Conservation Park encompasses spectacular landscapes of ice-steppened mountains and broad glaciated valleys in the Two Thumb range.
The park caters for a wide range of recreational activities including tramping, fishing, skiing (two ski areas in the park), ski touring, mountaineering, hunting, and mountain biking.  For more detailed information check with the DOC offices at Twizel or Geraldine.

Te Kahui Kaupeka takes its name from the ‘gathering place of the waters’ - from the mountain the rivers flow in all directions. Two of the rivers, the Rangitata and Waitaki, form the boundary of Aoraki.
There are numerous huts (mainly basic) dotted throughout Te Kahui Kaupeka Conservation Park.

Click here for more detailed information regarding Te Kahui Kaupeka Conservation Park. 



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Horse riding
Horse Riding
You may prefer to discover the sights in a more laid back approach.  45 minute horse treks are available from 'The Peel Forest Lodge'. 

Please visit www.peelforesthorsetrekking.co.nz or  www.peelforestlodge.co.nz for more information.
 

Rafting & Canoeing
Rafting & Canoeing
The Rangitata River is undoubtedly one of New Zealand's most exciting stretches of white water.  It is suitable for rafting and canoeing and provides a wide variety of conditions which become more difficult as one gets closer to the gorge.

For more information please visit:
www.rafts.co.nz

www.alps2ocean.co.nz
www.hiddenvalleys.co.nz
www.peelforestopc.org.nz

 

Fishing
Fishing
The Rangitata River is one of New Zealand's best known salmon fishing rivers.  Between December and June, the quinnat salmon run up the snow fed waters to the spawning grounds at the head of the river.
Once these fish enter the fresh water they do not feed, so many of them reach the spawning grounds in poor condition.  It is quite common to see these salmon in the Rangitata's small side streams from early March.
The fish usually follow the deepest water channel and rest up in the deeper holes.  Trout fishing is also available in the Rangitata River and Deep Creek near Mesopotamia station.


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Cultural Heritage
Cultural Heritage
The park has a long association with Māori legend and early pioneer history.
Legend has it that Chief Tarahaoa and his wife Hua-te-kerekere were washed up ashore, along with a few survivors, at Shag Point on their attempt to migrate north from South Otago. Their canoes destroyed, they wandered inland and lived the remainder of their lives where they could always see the sun go down. They prayed to their gods that on their death they should be changed into mountains.

The Gods obliged and Big Mount Peel and Little Mount Peel/Huatakerekere are really Tarahaoa and Hua-te-kerekere, inseparably linked to each other.They were survived by two children whom the Gods turned into two giant trees in the forest on their death. These two children also had four children who also wanted to remain close to the land. They prayed to the gods and when they died were turned into the Four Peaks, the mountain range adjoining Big Mount Peel and Little Mount Peel/Huatakerekere.
This illustrates yet again that to the Maori history and legend are seamless.

In 1849, Charles Torlesse was the first white man to explore the foothills hoping to discover coal. He called the bush Gurdon, but it was later changed to Peel Forest as a memorial to the British Prime Minister, Peel.

The first Europeans to establish homes were run holders – Jollie, Tripp and Acland. With them came dogs and cats that found native birds like quail and weka easy prey.
Visiting each other by crossing the river was perilous, the bush impenetrable. However, a road was later cut through the bush and a ferry was built in 1860 to cross the Rangitata. It was later replaced by a bridge in 1870.

Then the removal of the forest began. While their leases discouraged the settlers cultivating their land, they soon found out that burning made the rough grass more palatable to stock. The sawyers were pit-saw men. Working in pairs they pulled and pushed the big saws into the enormous logs.
After a year of felling the chief surveyor was shocked to see how many big trees had been removed and the devastation caused by the bullocks. The only way to slow down the destruction was to issue cutting licences.

From 1865 – 1908 Peel Forest was mainly a saw-milling village. Kahikatea was the first big timber to be felled and used for building. Tōtara was cut for fence posts and building. Steam engines, winches and tramways were built to make the log extraction easier.

By 1908 it was cheaper to import wood from Australia and the timber boom was over. Today the remains of several sawpits are still visible. After the timber felling farmers wanted stumps removed to make cultivation easier. Stumpers armed with gelignite loosened the tree roots.

The park was established in 1909 when 94 hectares of Crown land was set aside as a scenic reserve. Further additions have led to its current size of 773 hectares. It is a popular camping spot and day visitor destination.



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‘Peel Forest Store’   : :   Email: stay@peelforest.co.nz   : :   Site designed & created by ‘Junket’